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Technology News

How your smartphone can encourage active living

Of all screen-time enabling devices, smartphones are the truly ubiquitous ones, which in essence makes them tools of equity in the 21st century that provide access to billions of people around the world.

Flying cars: automating the skies means playing with our lives

As Harry Potter’s encounter with the Whomping Willow reminds us, flying cars can be dangerous. Before futuristic visions of three-dimensional sprawling city traffic can approach reality, there are some serious safety issues that need addressing.

This is Microsoft’s Xbox One S All Digital Edition console

We've been expecting something to turn up for a while and now it looks as though the cat may be out of the bag. Images of what appears to be Microsoft's disc-less console have turned up online, giving us some idea of what the console -- known as the Xbox One S All Digital -- could look like. 

Running Android 7.0 or later? Here’s how to use your smartphone as a two-factor authentication key

Two-factor authentication is a service that keeps your online accounts and services a whole lot safer than they would be otherwise. Why else would you lock down a Steam account using Steam Guard, a Blizzard account with Blizzard Authenticator, an Xbox Live account with whichever notification system from Microsoft annoys you the least? Shouldn't your more business-y accounts have the same protectio...[Read More]

Faster, more accurate diagnoses: Healthcare applications of AI research

In our lab at the University of Saskatchewan we are doing interesting deep learning research related to healthcare applications — and as a professor of electrical and computer engineering, I lead the research team. When it comes to health care, using AI or machine learning to make diagnoses is new, and there has been exciting and promising progress.

Disney+ launches in November this year, will cost R100pm

We've been expecting a late 2019 launch for Disney's own streaming service, Disney+, for quite some time. Now Disney has made it official, with the service officially launching on 12 November this year. As for pricing, it's going to cost just $6.99 (about R100) a month. But, before you get too excited, that launch date and pricing hasn't been announced for South Africa. Yet. 

The new eSIM card is a boon to consumers and a possible threat to mobile networks

But a new upgrade to the SIM card means life can even simpler.  Called an electronic SIM or eSIM, it is a way of linking your phone, using software, to a SIM (usually in a server rack at the service provider). The new iPhone Xs, which I am using, has an eSIM built in.

Flying cars could cut emissions, replace planes, and free up roads – but not soon enough

When Chitty Chitty Bang Bang was released 50 years ago, flying cars were a flight of fancy. Now, these futuristic vehicles are entering the outer fringes of reality. According to a new study published in Nature, for some journeys flying cars could eventually be greener than even electric road cars, cutting emissions while also reducing traffic on increasingly busy roads.

What makes the Impossible Burger look and taste like real beef?

The Impossible Burger has been sold in American restaurants since 2016 and is now expanding its market by teaming up with Burger King to create the Impossible Whopper

Qualcomm to make ‘gaming’ smartphones more accessible with the Snapdragon 730G

If you've been paying attention, you'll notice that mobile gaming is ramping up. And not just the Candy Crush sort of game, either. Full-fledged console games, custom stores, and battle royale are all more prominent than ever. But to actually play high-end titles, you need a high-end phone. Because high-end processors. Qualcomm's looking to change that,  a little, with the Snapdragon 730G.

Too many airplane systems rely on too few sensors

As an airplane plane defies gravity, aerodynamic principles expressed as mathematical formulas govern its flight. Most of an aircraft’s sensors are intended to monitor elements of those formulas, to reassure pilots that everything is as it should be – or to alert them that something has gone wrong.

Artificial intelligence can now emulate human behaviors – soon it will be dangerously good

When artificial intelligence systems start getting creative, they can create great things – and scary ones. Take, for instance, an AI program that let web users compose music along with a virtual Johann Sebastian Bach by entering notes into a program that generates Bach-like harmonies to match them.

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