Assassin’s Creed Valhalla Wrath Of The Druids Review – Off to the Emerald Isle

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8.8 Legendary

Players who enjoyed Assassin’s Creed: Valhalla will really want to plump for Wrath Of The Druids. The DLC brings with it some neat new additions, a thick, meaty campaign underpinned by a great story and a huge map teaming with collectibles and riches. You could argue that it’s ‘more of the same’, but in this instance, that’s no bad thing. Set sail for Ireland. You’ll be glad you did.

  • Variety 9
  • Combat 8.5
  • Plot 9
  • User Ratings (0 Votes) 0

In order to enjoy Wrath Of The Druids, players will probably accept that Assassin’s Creed: Valhalla is something of an odd duck in Ubisoft’s historical franchise.

While other entries put a premium (for the most part) on racing across rooftops, investigating cities for collectibles and targets and putting a premium on stealth, Valhalla took Odyssey’s open world template and ran with it.

To be honest, Valhalla has more in common with the last two Witcher games than it does with the rest of the Assassin’s Creed franchise.





And that’s not a bad thing at all. While parkour fans may have missed their fix in this entry, Ubsioft’s development team has shown that this series can sing even if it’s untethered from the urban conurbations it’s usually tied to. Assassin’s Creed: Valhalla reviewed very well and for good reason – it’s a bloody good game.

Whether you’re a player who clocked the base game, or whether you’re just getting into it, the first DLC pack Wrath Of The Druids is well worth investigating. The only barrier to buying this download is to honestly answer one of the two following questions: did you enjoy Valhalla or are you currently engaged in playing it? If the answer to either question is ‘yes’, then you’re going to enjoy yourself here.

Wrath Of The Druids: Off to the Emerald Isle

Once players download the DLC, a character named Azar pitches up at the docks of Ravensthrope – the settlement that players started in the base game – with information that Eivor (the game’s protagonist) just happens to have a cousin who is currently king of Dublin.

Eivor is sceptical at first but he’s prepared to jump into his longboat to investigate. It should be worth noting that before diving into Wrath Of The Druids that players had better make sure that Eivor is at least Level 55, because if he isn’t this DLC is going to be an arduous war of attrition. Incidentally, if players have levelled Eivor higher, the DLC adjusts the difficulty accordingly so it never feels like a cakewalk.





The longboat takes players to Ireland where, yes, Eivor’s cousin Barid is indeed king of Dublin, but like many of the kings in the base game, he’s struggling to control his city. Eivor offers Barid his services and before you know it, he’s charging around the Emerald Isle’s huge map building alliances, killing bandits and generally doing the same sort of thing players did in Assassin’s Creed: Valhalla. This time, though, there’s no interruptions from the present-day narrative.

More Valhalla, more value

So, Wrath Of The Druids at its core is just more Assassin’s Creed: Valhalla. Yes, there’s a plot involving a druid cult called The Children Of Danu and its designs on disrupting the orderly chaos Eivor and his family hope to impose on Ireland, but the DLC’s meat and potatoes basically mirror what players were doing in Valhalla. The main difference comes in the form of trading posts, which players should think of as mini-Ravensthorpes.

In order to curry favour with the local rulers and bring wealth to Dublin, Eivor is tasked with taking over bandit-ridden trading posts that produce everything from texts to clothes to other materials, which feed into Dublin, making it a more influential city.

Much as was the case with Ravensthorpe, the trading posts need to be outfitted with buildings to make them more productive and – yes, you guessed it – raw materials to accomplish this are gathered on Monastery raids. Once a trading post is fully upgraded, it produces resources at a faster rate, which players can then use to trade at Azar’s shop in Dublin for a whole host of unlockable items.

The second requirement players need to meet is a series of missions called Royal Demands. These are picked up by a talking to a court bard named Ciara. She sends Eivor off to complete quests he finds in pigeon coops around the map. These range from eliminating bandits to recovering royal jewellery and the like and they usually come with a couple of conditions – don’t take damage, don’t get detected – but players don’t have to fulfil these in order to complete the missions. These throwback missions will feel familiar to fans of the earlier Assassin’s Creed games.

Druids are bad news

The real draw in Wrath Of The Druids is its plot, which pits Eivor against the shadowy Children Of Danu.

Like a mini-gang of Templars, the Danu don’t just appear as rather sinister but tough enemies – and they are tough – their tendrils have spread through Ireland and one of the plots biggest twists is the revelation of which characters are secretly part of the of the cult. There’s considerably more political intrigue is this Assassin’s Creed yarn than in the base game and it even dips its toes into the realms of the supernatural. It’s great stuff throughout and the fifteen to twenty hours it takes to complete the main story in the DLC just fly by.

Wrath Of The Druids Verdict

Players who enjoyed Assassin’s Creed: Valhalla will really want to plump for Wrath Of The Druids. The DLC brings with it some neat new additions, a thick, meaty campaign underpinned by a great story and a huge map teaming with collectibles and riches. You could argue that it’s ‘more of the same’, but in this instance, that’s no bad thing. Set sail for Ireland. You’ll be glad you did.

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I've been writing about tech and games for around 20 years. Been playing games since I was tall enough to reach the controls on an arcade machine. Old enough to remember when games weren't something people yelled at each other about.

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